The Latest

Aug 20, 2014 / 1,084 notes

asylum-art:

Enchanting Ballpoint Pen Art by Ler huang

on Behance, Facebook

Taiwan based artist Ler Huang creates these experimental drawings with just using a ballpoint pen. Her drawing mainly focuses on fashion illustrations, and female models. The main part of her art is transitions in subjects and geometry usage in her compositions. The illustrated figures look very realistic and I like how she layers the characters by using different colors. Check out the Ler Huang’s outstanding artwork.

 

(via asylum-art-2)

Aug 19, 2014 / 4,740 notes

likeafieldmouse:

Patrick Tosani - Portraits (1985) - Color photographs & braille

(via chadwys)

Aug 17, 2014 / 1,543 notes

asylum-art:

Paired Photographic Images by William Farges _( nudity)

on Behance

Words from French photographer William Farges: “I did this work on the suggestion. My goal was to inspire me photographic style nude, while trying to renew. I first decided to focus on off-field taking part, not as the end of the picture, but as the beginning of the spectator’s imagination. Then, the more I walked this path, the more I had the urge to go further and create unreal body, chimeras bringing us to a state of conscious animal, contradictory and tortured. While on a work being polysemic, everyone sees what he wants. However, my intention is not to cultivate individual fantasies, but a reflection on the relationship between body and mind. The strength of my work is I think in its suggestive appearance. Indeed, by combining two images taken at two different times and without artifice, without editing, the viewer unconsciously accepts it and sees my body perception.”

(via asylum-art-2)

Aug 17, 2014 / 2,647 notes

asylum-art:

The Heavy Metal of Marilyn Minter

on Artsy

In visceral and gaudy paintings, photographs, and video works, Marilyn Minter examines the relationship between the body, cultural anxieties about sexuality and desire, and fashion imagery. Minter is best known for glossy, hyperrealistic paintings in enamel on metal that depict closeups of makeup-laden lips, eyes, and feet—a liquid-dripping gold-toothed smile or a pair of glistening high heels splashing in metallic fluid. Strut (2004–5) portrays a muddied foot in a gem-encrusted high heel. Minter also photographs body parts seen through panes of wet glass, captured from characteristically dynamic and provocative angles that suggest the seductive, disturbing nature of glamour.

(via asylum-art)

Aug 17, 2014 / 971 notes

asylum-art:

Ethereal Portraits by LakormisShowcase Horrific Beauty

on Behance, Facebook

Beauty is a treasured thing in our culture, and Turkish artist Merve Morkoç, aka Lakor mis, turns this ideal on its head. At first glance their paintings are of seemingly young, glowing-skinned models, but a longer gaze reveals that these subjects all have something seriously wrong with them. Coupled with their well-coiffed hair are fantastical disfigurations that you’d see in a horror film. Warped eyelids, caved in faces, and rashes exist on these young women.

Any sort of pleasant response you initially had is probably gone, and the works are like a train wreck that you can’t look away from. The strange details are intriguing, and it speaks to Morkoç’s expert handling of the medium that they are easily able to fool us into thinking something that’s repulsive is actually beautiful.



(via asylum-art)

Aug 17, 2014 / 1,030 notes
Aug 17, 2014 / 2,372 notes

asylum-art:

Ashley Mackenzie: The Philosophical Illustrations

artist on Tumblr

Ashley Mackenzie tackles complex questions about the relationship between mind and body, creating conceptual, illustrative works that stand at the cross-section of the philosophy of the mind and neuroscience. “As our knowledge of the brain becomes more comprehensive, it seems like the idea of the soul exists only in the gaps of our understanding,” Mackenzie writes on her website. Bodies melt like pools of liquid in these placid, sparsely-detailed illustrations as they visualize the inner workings of the mind.

(via asylum-art-2)

Aug 17, 2014 / 10,936 notes

asylum-art:

Isaac Cordal - Cement Eclipses. Chiapas, Mexico. 2013

artisr on tumblr

Isaac Cordal was in Mexico last year where he could give some new perspectives to his project Cement Eclipses. The Spanish artists so get inspired by the local folklore to stage his miniature sculptures in the streets of cities and villages located in Chiapas. Next to this, he also collaborated with young students of the Escuelita Zapatista. Together, they collected clay from the paths of the country and shaped some figurine then leaved to their own destiny. Here after, you’ll find pictures taken back from his South-American trip by Isaac. Lastly, let’s remind a book bringing together photographs of the installations he made last year in Nantes has been published. You’ll find it on Lalibrairie.com.

(via asylum-art-2)

Aug 17, 2014 / 1,180 notes

asylum-art:

Color Studies: Pink by Carissa Gallo

Artist on Tumblr

Portland based Photographer Carissa Gallo present her series “Color Studies-Pink” featuring a beautiful contrast of colour and the photographers love of muted tones.

(via asylum-art-2)

Aug 17, 2014 / 1,435 notes

asylum-art:

 Mircea Cantor, Sic Transit Gloria Mundi, 2012 - 19th Biennale of Sydney

Mircea Cantor (The vestal and the fire).  Gallery Yvon Lambert
To watch the video after this texte.

Mircea Cantor self-professes that he ‘lives and works on Earth’. With an art practice encompassing video, photography, drawing and installation, Cantor explores the broad experience of humanity, ruminating on themes of cultural history, memory and displacement. As part of the 19th Biennale of Sydney: You Imagine What You Desire, Mircea Cantor’s video work Sic Transit Gloria Mundi (2012) will be presented at the Art Gallery of NSW, along with his sculptural piece, Epic Fountain (2012).

Sic transit gloria mundi, a Latin phrase translating to ‘thus passes the glory of the world’, is a motto of both political and religious significance. Used by the media as political jargon, it has also been uttered during the coronation service of the Roman Catholic Pope. Cantor appropriates the saying as a memento mori, or symbolic reminder of the fragility of life and inevitability of death.

The video portrays a young, elegantly draped woman laying a burning fuse across the outstretched hands of a circle of faceless people. Set apart from the woman by both their clothing and posture, there is an unspoken acceptance among the group, a resignation that their fate lies in the hands of another. On their knees, the assembly appears as if in prayer, perhaps begging for forgiveness or, indeed, their lives. The woman could be the croupier in a game of roulette; each individual, a pawn in a play of chance. In conjunction with the film, the text ‘Sic Transit Gloria Mundi’ appears on the wall, handwritten in dynamite. Cantor’s installation is a reminder of the cycle of life, the breadth of humanity and the poetics of ignition.

A sense of line and trace connects much of Cantor’s artistic output. This interest manifests in various ways, from the personal trace of a person – a footprint or fingerprint – to a broader reflection on the traces left by nations and civilisations as a whole. Photography is employed by Cantor as a simple and effective means to document these movements. Shortcuts (2004) is a photographic triptych revealing the off-route pathways created by walkers through a park in Cantor’s Romanian hometown. These unofficial tracks, deviating from the course set by the original town planners, reflect on the organic nature and independent will of individuals.
Cantor’s film Tracking Happiness (2009) presents the viewer with seven identically dressed and physically similar women slowly following each other in a circle. The women are walking on a fine bed of white sand, sweeping away the footsteps of those before them, only to create a trace of their own as they walk over patches they have just cleared. The circular path, having neither beginning nor end, creates an endless, arduous and ultimately futile task for the sweeping women. Their fate seems akin to that of a circle of chained prisoners, while their broomsticks and the ritual of circling allude to magic and witchcraft. The film can be seen as a metaphor for our contemporary technology-led lives in which the new is continually replaced by the newer (but to what end?), or – as the work’s title suggests – humanity’s endless, and ultimately hopeless, pursuit of an ideal of happiness.

watch the video:
mircea cantor Sic Transit Gloria Mundi

(via asylum-art-2)